San Francisco

16 of the East Bay’s Most Incredible Hikes

More than 1,250 miles of trails are waiting to be explored.

Flickr/Dileep Eduri
Flickr/Dileep Eduri
Flickr/Dileep Eduri

It’s hardly a secret anymore that there are some legit reasons to live in and visit the East Bay, like warmer weather than foggy San Francisco, art collectives and galleries, and great restaurants, to name a few. Another perk that you may not know about the East Bay is that it also has proximity to incredible open-air spaces (the East Bay Park District alone is 125,000 acres), and therefore lots of amazing public parks (73) and trails (1,250 miles). And the cherry on top? The East Bay’s trails aren’t as crowded as a lot of the ones in Marin. And they lead to insane views, ancient seabeds, secret labyrinths, volcanoes (?!), and probably a desire to relocate if you haven’t made that move already. Or at least to visit a helluva lot more often.

If you’re looking for inspiration to get outdoors, you’ll find it in these hikes, of which there are a range of difficulties since some days you want to trek 13 miles to reach the Bay’s highest waterfall (if it cooperates), and other days you just want to meander for a few miles so you can feel like you “did” “something” (which, you will have!).

All of the distances below are calculated round-trip. Please make sure to bring lots of water (not every park has it readily available) and reapply your sunscreen often. Oh, and don’t forget snacks. Not like you ever would.

Flickr/C N
Flickr/C N
Flickr/C N

Murietta Falls Trail

Livermore
Distance: 13 miles
Trailhead: Sailor Camp Trail, Del Valle Regional Park
Del Valle Regional Park is known for its five-mile-long lake where you can boat, fish, and swim, but that’s not why you’re going on this particular hike, which can either result in the elation of seeing the Bay Area’s highest waterfall or the utter frustration of having just hiked six-miles over an elevation gain of 4,500-feet in order to see a dry rock. Truthfully, even when it has rained enough to get this waterfall flowing, it’s mostly just a robust 100-foot trickle that ends in a small plunge pool, but the point is: it’s the highest waterfall in the Bay Area, and you busted your ass to see it. Important things to know: 1.) Plan to make this trek during the winter after we’ve had a couple of days of steady rain. 2.) You’ll need a permit to hike the Ohlone Wilderness Trail in the Ohlone Regional Wilderness (Del Valle is the eastern gateway to this scenic area). Honestly, even if you only see barely a trickle, the hike is gorgeous (lots of vistas year-round and wildflowers in the spring) and rewarding. The trails are marked well throughout. Just be sure to follow the Ohlone Wilderness Trail for 5.3-miles and then keep an eye out for the Murietta Falls and Stewart’s Camp sign as that’s where you’ll turn right and walk for another mile to reach the maybe-water-maybe-not fall.

Flickr/David Abercrombie
Flickr/David Abercrombie
Flickr/David Abercrombie

Stonewall Panoramic Trail

Oakland
Distance: 1.5 miles
Trailhead: Start at the trailhead on Stonewall Road in Claremont Canyon Regional Preserve
Sometimes all you want is a hike that’s a hike without really being a hike. On those days, head to the Stonewall Panoramic Trail inside Claremont Canyon Regional Preserve, a 208-acre preserve in the Oakland Hills right behind the Claremont Hotel. The trail is pretty short, but there are four steep segments and a total elevation gain of almost 1,000 feet, plus it leads to a vista with panoramic views of the Bay. Ultimately, you’ll get to enjoy some gorgeous scenery and, even though you thought you were just having a lazy hike, you’ll definitely also get your heart rate up.

Palos Colorados Trail

Oakland
Distance: Three miles
Trailhead: Start in Joaquin Miller Park
This mellow hike is great for all skill levels and anyone who want an easy out-and-back hike with a little bit of elevation gain (688 feet), lots of lush landscape (including second-growth redwood groves), and plenty of shade (at least at the beginning and end). You’ll start on the Palos Colorados Trail, a gorge filled with redwoods and tree limbs dripping with ivy, until you hit the Sunset Trail. From there, you’ll go left to reach the Cinderella Trail (watch out for mountain bikers), where you’ll climb a small hill to reach a hilltop redwood grove. Take the Big Trees Trail to get to, well, a grove of big trees (the best redwood grove in the park, in our opinion), stop and have a snack, and then head back down.

Flickr/wxwillett
Flickr/wxwillett
Flickr/wxwillett

Nimitz Way to Rotary Peace Grove

Berkeley
Distance: Four miles
Trailhead: Inspiration Point in Tilden Regional Park off Wildcat Canyon Rd.
If you’re new to the majesty of the East Bay Regional Park District, consider this trail your gateway drug. Paved, well-marked, and with immediate vista payoffs around every turn (starting with the parking lot), Nimitz Way is a multi-generational crowd-pleaser.

On weekends, the trail can be jammed with joggers, strollers, dogs, and families, so if you’re seeking peace and the ability to stay six feet apart from everyone, go mid-week. Nearing the two-mile mark, take Wildcat Peak trail to reach the Rotary Peace Grove, a grove of giant sequoias planted to honor people and organizations that cultivate world peace. (There are plaques under the trees that name Mother Teresa, Nelson Mandela, and Martin Luther King, Jr., as well as others.) After you’ve wandered through the grove, keep going up the trail about another quarter of a mile, where you’ll find a huge circular stone bench and some of the most stunning 360-degree views of the Bay Area you’ll ever come across. If you’re bringing a picnic, this is the spot to enjoy it.

Flickr/gwen
Flickr/gwen
Flickr/gwen

Lake Chabot Loop

Castro Valley
Distance: 3.64 miles or nine miles
Trailhead: Lake Chabot Marina, Lake Chabot Regional Park
Take the paved West Shore trail (3.64 miles roundtrip) from the Marina to the dam for views of the lake and the (to be fair: very slim) chance of seeing a bald eagle soaring above the water searching for trout. This part of the hike is extremely easy and can also be done on a bike. If you’re looking for something a little more strenuous, continue on from the dam to circle the lake via the West Shore Trail, to Bass Cove Trail, to Columbine Trail, to Honker Bay Trail, to Cameron Loop Trail, to East Shore Trail back to the Marina (9.5 miles roundtrip). Just keep your eyes open for trail markers because they aren’t always obvious. If your dog is up for it, he can come along, but just be absolutely sure to keep him out of the water, which is full of toxic blue-green algae.

East Ridge to West Ridge Loop

Oakland
Distance: 10 miles (word on the pedometer is that the map isn’t right when it says 8.2 miles)
Trailhead: Canyon Meadow Staging Area, Reinhardt Redwood Regional Park
Redwood Regional Park is home to most of the East Bay’s redwoods (all second-growth since the original ones were logged). This is a sweet loop circling the prize jewel that is the Redwood Regional Park. Start at the Canyon Meadow Staging area, where you’ll find the Canyon Trail. From there, it’s a short hop up to the East Ridge Trail. Cruise the east side, where the unsheltered ridge provides sweeping views. Keep an eye out for fast-moving mountain bikers. Breezing through the Skyline Gate Staging Area is your approximate halfway marker, where you’ll link on to the West Ridge Trail (where you have wide-open views towards Contra Costa) to complete the circuit.

Flickr/Miguel Vieira
Flickr/Miguel Vieira
Flickr/Miguel Vieira

Flag Hill Trail

Sunol
Distance: 2.5 miles
Trailhead: Visitor center, Sunol Regional Wilderness
Take Shady Glen Trail out of the visitor center lot, cross the small bridge over Alameda Creek (Alameda County’s largest stream), and link up to Flag Hill Trail. You’ll quickly climb out of the woods as you gain elevation. It’s a steep slope with a lot of switchbacks, but at the top, you’ll get fantastic views across the valley, reservoir, and watershed, as well as sandstone formations with fossils of life from ancient seabeds and maybe even a bobcat sighting.

Skyline Gate Loop

Oakland
Distance: Five miles
Trailhead: Skyline Gate Staging Area, Reinhardt Redwood Regional Park
Reason No. 5,487 we love Northern California: 150-foot coastal redwood trees in our backyard. And unlike Muir Woods, these redwoods don’t require a reservation in advance (although, unlike Muir Woods’ old growth redwoods, these are second-growth since the original ones were logged). From Skyline Gate, walk the exposed East Ridge Trail until you hook right down into the park’s valley on Prince Trail. The temperatures dip coming off the ridge, and you’ll notice the immediate change in vegetation. Descending Prince Trail, hook left on Stream Trail. (From November to February, be on the lookout for wintering ladybugs who take up camp in clusters by the millions right near this trail intersection.) Take a minute to appreciate the calm and quiet among the massive redwoods. Follow Stream Trail until taking a right on Fern Trail. Get your heart rate up as you climb out of the valley on Fern Trail. When you hit West Ridge, take a right, and follow it all the way back to Skyline Gate, enjoying/Insta-ing the gorgeous views along the way.

Falls Trail Loop

Clayton
Distance: 7.9 miles
Trailhead: Mitchell Canyon Visitor Center, Mount Diablo State Park
Waterfalls in the East Bay? Maybe not in the summer and fall when it’s hot and dry, but possibly in the winter and spring when they’ve been activated by Mother Nature. Head to Mt. Diablo State Park after a recent rainfall to see for yourself. The hike is pretty hard, and the going can be slippery if there’s been precipitation recently, but there’s a series of lovely waterfalls throughout all the hard work (especially if you’re there during the springtime; you may be out of luck during the high-drought season). The trail loop isn’t terribly complicated, but the trail names switch up a bit, so stay alert. If beautiful, flowing water isn’t your thing, skip the falls and take in the Mount Diablo Summit. Usually, there are two ways to do this: 1) hike the North Peak like a badass and enjoy your hard-earned views, or 2) take the lazy way and drive up to the Summit Parking Area. But the reward is always better when you really earn it, right? Go on a clear day for visibility over 40,000 square miles that includes segments of 35 of California’s 58 counties.

Flickr/Sarah Stierch
Flickr/Sarah Stierch
Flickr/Sarah Stierch

Round Top Volcanoes

Oakland
Distance: Three miles
Trailhead: Sibley Staging Area, Sibley Volcanic Regional Preserve
Labyrinths, volcanoes, and vistas, oh my! Not only is Sibley fun for bird-watching, but it’s also of keen interest to geologists and science stars. Round Top peak (elevation 1,763 feet) is made up of 10-million-year-old volcanic stuff and is the result of tectonic action between the Hayward and Moraga faults. Print this self-guided volcanoes tour before you go (or hope you have cell service the entire time) to get all of the real geological dirt. At stop No. 5, you’ll see a labyrinth at the base of the quarry that adds a mystical touch and gives you a moment to meditate. Get a dose of ancient history, and enjoy a beautiful hike with views of the rolling hills surrounding you.

Upper Seafoam Loop

El Sobrante
Distance: Two miles
Trailhead: Behind the park office, Kennedy Grove Regional Recreation Area
Start in the tranquil lawn area in the park’s only entrance off San Pablo Dam Road. Hop onto the Laurel Loop Trail behind the park office. Follow Laurel Loop-leaving behind the eucalyptus trees in the picnic area-until you reach Lower Seafoam Trail. Curve right on the path and enjoy the beautiful views of the San Pablo Reservoir as the trail opens. Continue on and merge onto Upper Seafoam Trail, where the elevation picks up-as will your heart rate. Keep on truckin’ up to the twisted and beautiful trees in the oak grove at the peak of the trail, a lovely spot to enjoy a picnic (and catch your breath). When Upper Seafoam hits Kennedy Creek Trail, hook left and bring it home. And maybe enjoy a well-earned picnic area in the shade of those aforementioned trees.

Flickr/John Lambert Pearson
Flickr/John Lambert Pearson
Flickr/John Lambert Pearson

Wildcat Creek Trail – San Pablo Ridge Trail Loop

Richmond
Distance: Six miles
Trailhead: Alvarado Area, Wildcat Canyon Regional Park
Besides having arguably the coolest name of the parks, Wildcat Canyon is the perfect place for hikers who live in El Sobrante and El Cerrito. Abutting Tilden’s northern-ish edge, Nimitz Way continues into this park. To take the featured loop, enter at Alvarado Staging Area and head out on (the also paved) Wildcat Creek Trail. Hopefully the creek will be full of water as you parallel it until reaching Mezue Trail where you turn left to begin your ascent. This portion is steep at times, but your hard work is rewarded as views of Mount Tam, San Francisco, and the entire East Bay open up. Turn left when you reach San Pablo Ridge Trail, appreciating the views of Mt. Diablo and San Pablo Reservoir. The descent can be steep, but the views sure are purdy. Merge left onto Belgum Trail, which will bring you back to Wildcat Creek Trail to complete the loop.

Flickr/Franco Folini
Flickr/Franco Folini
Flickr/Franco Folini

Briones Crest Trail Loop

Lafayette
Distance: Eight miles
Trailhead: Bear Creek Staging Area, Briones Regional Park
Briones is the right-in-your-backyard spot you’ve been missing out on. For spectacular views and a solid workout, take the eight-mile Briones Crest Trail. Head out of Bear Creek Staging Area, up and around the park on Briones Crest Trail (all the while enjoying breathtaking vistas), then back down until reaching Seaborg Trail just past mile six. Seaborg Trail will bring you back from whence you came. Briones is full of accessible hiking trails with a variety of options for shorter loops, so choose your own adventure if you’re just after a quickie. If you’re only going to visit this park once a year, go in the spring when all the wildflowers are popping.

Flickr/Sathish J
Flickr/Sathish J
Flickr/Sathish J

Mission Peak

Fremont
Distance: Seven miles
Trailhead: Ohlone College, 43600 Mission Boulevard, Fremont, CA
Due to the popularity of this hike, Mission Peak Regional Preserve requests hikers park at Ohlone College to relieve overburdened staging areas in residential neighborhoods, and you’ll understand why it’s so popular once you get there-if feeling like you’re on top of the world is a thing you’re into. View the Santa Cruz Mountains to the west, Mt. Tam to the north, and the Sierra Nevadas and Mt. Diablo to the northeast. Winter is a great time to go for glimpses of snow-capped mountains. Spring also yields tons of wildflowers. You’ll gain about 2,000 feet in elevation (it takes about five hours round-trip), so you’ll definitely want to bring water and probably also snacks.

Flickr/Miguel Vieira
Flickr/Miguel Vieira
Flickr/Miguel Vieira

Las Trampas Loop

San Ramon
Distance: 6.2 miles
Trailhead: Staging area, Las Trampas Regional Wilderness
If you’re looking for super steep hikes, you’ve come to the right place. Head out on Chamise Trail, then merge left onto Las Trampas Ridge Trail, hook right on Corduroy Hills Trail, right on Madrone Trail, to Sulphur Springs Trail, to Trapline Trail. Winter and spring are perfect seasons to hike here. Be sure to bring your own water because right now there isn’t any available inside of the park.

Flickr/Nick Fullerton
Flickr/Nick Fullerton
Flickr/Nick Fullerton

Huckleberry Path

Oakland
Distance: Two miles
Trailhead: Main parking area off Skyline Boulevard, Huckleberry Botanic Regional Preserve
Due to unique soil and climatic conditions, the native huckleberry plants found on Huckleberry Path can’t be found anywhere else in the East Bay. Even better? Huckleberry has blossoming plants year-round (many of which are labeled with names and facts), so you don’t have to wait until spring to cash in on the goods. This trail is short and sweet, but it’s also very narrow, so be prepared to step aside for others. You’re also going to want to go to town with the bug spray before you set out.

Big C Hike

Berkeley
Distance: 1.25 miles
Trailhead: It’s poorly marked, but find the parking lot behind Foothill (off of Cyclotron Road) and go to the very end of the lot and make a U-turn at the only uphill path (near the southeast corner).

This is actually a mildly strenuous hike since you gain about 1,000 feet of elevation, but the payoff is 1) you get to see THE ENTIRE BAY AREA, literally, North Bay, SF, all of the East Bay, and 2) you’ll get to see UC Berkeley’s Big C up close and personal, which the charter for the school is buried underneath. Also a cool side stop on the way: There’s a trail split mid-way up and if you go right it’ll take you out to Tightwad Hill where students/alums without game tickets get a not-bad view of Cal football in action right next to the victory cannon. Oh, and there’s a swing!Want more Thrillist? Follow us on¬†Instagram,¬†Twitter,¬†Pinterest,¬†YouTube,¬†TikTok, and¬†Snapchat.

Daisy Barringer is a SF-based writer who has never appreciated all of the Bay Area’s hikes as much as she does right now. Follow her on Instagram @daisysf to see where she goes next.

Annie Crawford is a freelance writer living in Oakland, CA. Follow her @ReinaAnnie.

San Francisco

How to Celebrate Black History Month in San Francisco

Support and celebrate SF's Black community.

Courtesy of Black Joy Parade
Courtesy of Black Joy Parade
Courtesy of Black Joy Parade

Though it’s something we need to be doing every day of every month of every year, Black History Month encourages us to pay tribute to the struggles and oppression generations of Black Americans have faced, as well as their often-neglected triumphs and achievements that have helped shape this county and make it better. It’s a time to reflect on how we can do better to confront racism and oppression, which this year’s theme, “Black Resistance,” echoes. This is especially important in a town like San Francisco, where the Fillmore District was known as “the Harlem of the West” before the city displaced a vast portion of the neighbourhood’s Black community in the ’60s and ’70s. This displacement continues today, as the Black population is the only racial group that has declined in every census since 1970.

If you’re looking for ways to celebrate Black History Month, there are lots to do. Whether you want to educate yourself by attending films, performances, or conversations, share the joy at a parade or dance party, or do a little bit of it all at a drag show, here are just a few ways you can get involved and have a lot of fun while doing so:

Visit San Francisco Public Library branches for workshops, films, performances, and more

February (and throughout the year)
Library branches and online
SFPL’s “More Than a Month” celebration focuses on the theme of resistance this year. Family-friendly and adult events include film screenings, musical performances, book clubs, workshops, and more.
Cost: Free

Museum of African Diaspora
Museum of African Diaspora
Museum of African Diaspora

See art, poetry, films, talks, and more at MoAD

February (and throughout the year)
SoMa
Right now, at the Museum of African Diaspora, you can see the first and only West Coast exhibition of “The New Black Vanguard: Photography Between Art and Fashion,” which highlights the work of 15 contemporary fashion designers “whose images present radically new perspectives on the medium of photography and art, race and beauty, and gender and power.” The museum, which has a robust year-round program and event calendar, has a slew of events to attend, including youth poetry readings, film screenings, open mic nights, book clubs, artist talks, and more.
Cost: Event prices vary; GA to visit the museum is $12 but free every second Saturday of the month

Check out films, art, reading, talks, and more at BAMPFA

February (and throughout the year)
Berkeley
There is always something interesting to discover at the Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA). During Black History Month, you can see films by Pratibha Parmar, “Felwine Sarr: Music, Freedom, Africa,” a conversation through music with the Senegalese writer, scholar, composer, musician, and more.
Cost: Varies

Old Skool Cafe
Old Skool Cafe
Old Skool Cafe

Enjoy menu specials honoring Black community members at Old Skool Cafe

February (and throughout the year)
Bayview
For Black History Month, Old Skool Cafe is adding the favourite meals of notable Black community members to the menu each weekend. The nonprofit, youth-run supper club helps at-risk, formerly incarcerated, and foster care youth ages 16-22 gain the skills and experience they need to succeed in various front and back-of-house restaurant roles. Bayview hero/community advocate Mrs. Dorris Vincent is first up, followed by Judge Trina Thompson, Delroy Lindo, and Mayor London Breed.

Yerba Buena Gardens
Yerba Buena Gardens
Yerba Buena Gardens

Walk beneath the Marting Luther King, Jr. Memorial waterfall

February (and ongoing)
Yerba Buena Gardens
Did you know that Yerba Buena Gardens is home to the country’s second-largest memorial to Dr. King? Visit the sculptural waterfall featuring glass panels inscribed with his inspiring words at 750 Howard Street.
Cost: Free

Attend the Commonwealth’s “Dreaming Forward: A Celebration of Black Joy, Power, and Excellence” conference

Thursday, February 9
Embarcadero
On behalf of Dr. Sheryl Evans Davis and the San Francisco Human Rights Commission, the Commonwealth Club is hosting its second annual Dream Keeper Initiative, a day-long conference/celebration/call-to-action featuring special guests, including April Ryan of TheGrio and CNN.
Cost: Free

Courtesy of Oakland First Fridays
Courtesy of Oakland First Fridays
Courtesy of Oakland First Fridays

Celebrate Black Love at Oakland First Fridays

Friday, February 10
Telegraph Avenue from West Grand to 27th Street
Telegraph Avenue transforms into a dining, shopping, and art-appreciating party on Friday, February 10, from 5 pm to 9 pm. There will be food, artist, and retail vendors and a host of Black artists, authors, and entertainment. Please note: This event was rescheduled from February 3 because of potential rain.
Cost: Free

Have a ball at an all-Black drag show at Oasis

Friday, February 10
SoMa
“Reparations with Latrice Royale” is an all-Black drag show hosted by Latrice Royale, the beloved Drag Race star who also happens to be celebrating her birthday.
Cost: $15 to $60

Dance all night and shop all day at the Afro Soca Love carnival and marketplace

Friday, February 10 ‚Äď Saturday, February 11
341 13th Street, Oakland
Afro Soca Love creates experiences that act as a “gateway to building bonds and strengthen relationships-between communities, individuals, and Africa and its diaspora.” See for yourself at the all-ages marketplace (Saturday), where you’ll find food and drink, fashion, beauty and wellness, home decor, and more. But before the shopping comes the dancing at the 21+ Friday Night Carnival, a culturally immersive music experience with music from all over the world.
Cost: The marketplace is free; tickets to the Friday Night Carnival start at $20

See a live performance of “Words That Made the Difference: Brown vs. the Board of Education”

Saturday, February 11
Unity Palo Alto
See a live theatrical performance based on the true events that occurred in the fight to end school segregation. The script draws from trial transcripts of the five cases brought together in front of the Supreme Court and Chief Justice Earl Warren’s memoirs, and the play is set in the courtrooms where it all happened. There will be a Q&A with the playwright before the performance and the cast afterward.
Cost: Free

Courtesy of San Francisco Bay Area Theatre Company
Courtesy of San Francisco Bay Area Theatre Company
Courtesy of San Francisco Bay Area Theatre Company

Go to the I, Too, Sing America album release party

Saturday, February 11
Mission
Head to the Brava Theater Center to celebrate the San Francisco Bay Area Theatre Company’s album release of the music created for I, Too, Sing America, a soulful and uplifting performance that moved audiences when it debuted last year. The night includes an album-listening and sing-along party, DJs, dancing, an open bar, and more.
Cost: $40

Go on the Black Liberation Walking Tour of West Oakland

Saturday, February 18
West Oakland
Take a walk with David Peters, founder of the West Oakland Cultural Action Network, and Gene Anderson, the author of Legendary Locals of Oakland, to learn about resident voices and document sites of cultural and historical significance in the neighbourhood. Peters is a local native, and Anderson is an Oakland historian whose family has historical roots in West Oakland.
Cost: $50 ($30 for West Oakland residents)

See a screening of The Black Kung Fu Experience followed by in-person demonstrations

Sunday, February 19
Great Star Theater, Chinatown
The Chinese Historical Society of America is celebrating Black History Month and social unity with a screening of this film about how a group of African American pioneers became respected in a subculture dominated by Chinese and white men. Afterward, there will be demonstrations and talks with Sifu Donald Hamby and Sifu Troy Dunwood, who “will speak about their success as internationally recognized martial arts masters, their Chinese Kung Fu teachers, and what this practice means in relation to diversity, race and inclusion issues.”
Cost: $15

Sip wine made by Black winemakers at a free tasting event at STEM Kitchen + Garden

Thursday, February 23
Dogpatch
STEM Kitchen + Garden is hosting an afternoon wine tasting celebrating Black-owned wineries in its gorgeous indoor/outdoor space, and best of all, and it’s free to the public!
Cost: Free

Bayview Opera House
Bayview Opera House
Bayview Opera House

Attend the San Francisco African American Arts & Cultural District Gala Fundraiser

Saturday, February 25
Bayview Opera House
Enjoy an evening of talent, fashion, and community inspiration at SFAAACD’s 1st Annual Gala Fundraiser. Carla Duke, Television News Director at CBS-KPIX Chanel 5, will host the event, which includes inspiring words from keynote speaker Aniyia Williams, an artist, tech creator, and system-preneur.
Cost: $100

Attend a Black History Month & Chinese New Year Poetry Reading on Angel Island

Saturday, February 25
Angel Island
There is so much history in poetry at the Angel Island Detention Barracks Museum, which makes it a fitting location for poets Chun Yu and Michael Warr. The co-founders of Two Languages/One Community will share their poems and stories in English and Chinese, accompanied by projected images of text and photographs.
Cost: $10 to $21

Courtesy of Black Joy Parade
Courtesy of Black Joy Parade
Courtesy of Black Joy Parade

Feel the joy at the Black Joy Parade

Sunday, February 26
Downtown Oakland
This parade and festival celebrate the “Black experience past, present, and future.” Be prepared to experience “more Black joy than you ever imagined,” starting with the parade (beginning at 14th and Franklin) at 12:30 pm. The family-friendly festival follows (main entrance is at 19th and Franklin) will include 200-plus Black-owned small businesses selling food, drinks, clothing, art, and more. There will also be two stages with Black performers, including The Black Joy Choir.
Cost: Free

Take a sound bath at Grace Cathedral in honor of Black History Month

Monday, February 27
Nob Hill
Take an immersive sound bath featuring Fractals of Sound, a collective of top Bay Area musicians Egemen Sanli, Phoenix Song, and Sam Jackson, with special guest Destiny Muhammad. Together, they will create a “soundscape deeply rooted in world music,” allowing you to take a meditative journey in one of the most beautiful places in San Francisco.
Cost: $25 to $75

See Tsitsi Dangarembga and Angela Davis at City Arts & Lectures

Tuesday, February 28
Civic Center
Co-presented with MoAd, City Arts & Lectures is hosting novelist Tsitsi Dangarembga and scholar and activist Angela Davis for what’s sure to be a riveting conversation.
Cost: $36

Get the latest from Thrillist Australia delivered straight to your inbox, subscribe here.

Daisy Barringer¬†is an SF-based freelance writer who spent many childhood days wandering around the Exploratorium. Follow her on¬†Instagram¬†to see what she’s up to now.

Related

Our Best Stories, Delivered Daily
The best decision you'll make all day.