Entertainment

Pizza Poppa Is the MCU's Best New Character

'Doctor Strange and the Multiverse of Madness' introduces a new hero and his name is Pizza Poppa.

Michael Tullberg/Getty Images
Michael Tullberg/Getty Images
Michael Tullberg/Getty Images

There are plenty of cameos in Doctor Strange and the Multiverse of Madness, including some that will elicit copious feelings from people who have spent years obsessively thinking about the Marvel Cinematic Universe. But there is only one new character introduced that actually matters. His name is Pizza Poppa. And Pizza Poppa always gets paid.

Who is Pizza Poppa? Pizza Poppa is a purveyor of pizza balls on Earth-838, one of the parallel universes Stephen Strange (Benedict Cumberbatch) and his new acolyte America Chavez (Xochtil Gomez) visit. Most importantly, Pizza Poppa is portrayed by Bruce Campbell.

The 40 minutes of this latest Doctor Strange outing are oddly lackluster, but the action clicks into gear when Pizza Poppa shows up, because Pizza Poppa lets you know that you are actually in a Sam Raimi movie. As my colleague Emma Stefansky wrote in her review, the going gets good when Raimi starts to pull out the old tricks from his toolbox-the askew angles and jump scares that made his Evil Dead trilogy a classic. And who is the star of those Evil Dead movies? Why none other than Bruce Campbell.

Campbell was Raimi’s childhood friend who became his horror protagonist avatar when he played Ash Williams in The Evil Dead, Evil Dead II, and Army of Darkness. Over the course of the three movies, pursued by countless Deadites, Campbell perfected his persona: A human cartoon with bravado to spare who can take hits like Wile E. Coyote. Pizza Poppa capitalizes on this trait.

When Strange and America land in this universe, America quickily seeks out some food, in the form of a concoction known as “pizza balls.” (Think: Garlic knots covered with cheese and pepperoni. They look pretty tasty.) America wrongly assumes that these goodies are free, since food in most worlds are, apparently. Not so. Pizza Poppa always gets paid. Except here he doesn’t.

Strange, using his magic, turns Pizza Poppa on himself, making him squirt mustard on his face, and punch himself silly. And while we don’t condone this-Pizza Poppa deserves his money!-it’s exactly the kind of Three Stooges-inspired material that we want when Raimi and Campbell get together. Give me a half an hour of it. Make it like the sequence in Army of Darkness where Campbell has to fight a bunch of mini-mes.

Raimi has a tradition of sticking his muse in his superhero outings. Campbell appeared in all three of Raimi’s Spider-Man in various roles as thorns in Peter Parker’s side. In the first movie, he’s the wrestling announcer who thinks “the Human Spider” is a stupid name. In the second, he’s the usher who won’t let Peter into Mary Jane’s play. Finally, in the third, he’s a snooty French maitre d. All these men, as well as Pizza Poppa, exist to be pain in the asses for our heroes. While these superheroes may face world ending threats, Campbell is there to serve as the more mundane kind of obstacle.

Now that Tobey Maguire’s Spidey sort of exists in the MCU, could you make the case that all these Bruce Campbell characters do in addition to Pizza Poppa. Sure! But that’s not really the point here. The point is that Pizza Poppa ALWAYS GETS PAID. Thank goodness for Pizza Poppa.Want more Thrillist? Follow us on InstagramTwitterPinterestYouTubeTikTok, and Snapchat.

Esther Zuckerman is a senior entertainment writer at Thrillist. Follow her on Twitter @ezwrites.

Entertainment

'Top Gun: Maverick' Is the Perfect Adrenaline Rush

Tom Cruise's sequel brings the charms of the original classic into the modern era.

Paramount Pictures
Paramount Pictures
Paramount Pictures

What does it take to make a great action drama? Fighter jets. Kenny Loggins music. Tom Cruise. In 1986, Top Gun, perhaps the ultimate “guys being dudes” action movie set within a training school for the Navy’s best fighter pilots, patented this formula, and added in a bunch of sweaty guys playing beach volleyball and an iconic love scene to seal the deal. Top Gun‘s massive popularity made the announcement of a sequel seem the most natural thing in the world, if not the most exciting: an elder Tom Cruise handing the reins off to a new generation of elite actors. If that’s what you’re expecting, you’re in for a surprise. Top Gun is a classic. Top Gun: Maverick does everything Top Gun did and more.

It’s been thirty-six years since Captain Pete “Maverick” Mitchell (Tom Cruise) completed his TOPGUN program, but he’s far from the decorated officer he was destined to become by the end of the first movie. He’s dodged every promotion he could dodge, working as a test pilot flying hypersonic stealth jets for the military, but the specter of unmanned drones looms ever closer, spelling the end for an entire era of warfare. Not so fast, though-Maverick is called back to a certain fighter training school as an instructor, tasked with putting together a team of the best of the best to complete a bombing run involving some absurdly complex flying maneuvers at high speed much too close to the ground in enemy territory. If you will, an impossible mission.

The new crop of airmen, now flying F/A-18 Hornets instead of F-14 Tomcats, are kids in Maverick’s eyes, and he shows up to teach them what’s what, inventing training exercises to test their mettle and teach them how to fly as a team. It’s not going to be easy, with the egos of pilots like “Hangman” (Glen Powell), “Fanboy” (Danny Ramirez), “Coyote” (Greg Tarzan Davis) and “Phoenix” (Monica Barbaro) repeatedly clashing as they struggle to work together. And there are two more problems: He only has a few weeks to train these kiddos up to fly a mission from which they might not all return, and one of his students, sullen Lieutenant Bradley “Rooster” Bradshaw (Miles Teller), is the son of Maverick’s old flying partner Goose, who tragically died in the first movie. Not to mention reconnecting with an old flame, single mother Penny (Jennifer Connelly), who manages the local bar and is not about to fall yet again for a guy who’s left her more than once. You see where this is going.

Paramount Pictures
Paramount Pictures
Paramount Pictures

The movie begins with a collection of the greatest hits of its predecessor, including but not limited to a montage of jets landing on an aircraft carrier lit by the golden light of the sun, Kenny Loggins’ “Danger Zone,” and Maverick defying orders to do something with an aircraft that nobody’s ever done before. This is, after all, a movie that will have more than a few similarities to the one that came before. After that, though, the engines kick into gear (I apologize if this car metaphor doesn’t also work for planes), and Top Gun: Maverick starts to try out a few new tricks.

The interpersonal relationships between the characters are fun and fully realized (Maverick’s perpetual battle of egos with his commanding officer, a Vice Admiral known as “Cyclone” (Jon Hamm) is a highlight) and there’s just enough downtime between white-knuckle action to really get to know everyone. The sweaty beach game returns, but the macho posturing is toned down, given that we live in a new millennium and one of the main pilots is a woman. Val Kilmer reprises his “Iceman” for a touching scene. All of this is complemented by unbelievable flying sequences that will genuinely leave you breathless, each lightning-fast dogfight game and training simulation grander and faster than the last. This is the type of film to see as big and loud as possible.

But, as the original was, Top Gun: Maverick is also simply a straight-up great time at the movies. It makes the act of being a good movie look like the easiest thing in the world, with director Joseph Kosinski showing off everything he’s got. (Yes, you should give Tron: Legacy another shot.) Because “the enemy” is never named, as in the first movie, it is comfortably apolitical (if you disregard the fact that the jets Maverick eventually goes up against are Russian, and what a boon the original Top Gun was for U.S. military recruitment programs), and even though the whole movie is working towards a life-or-death wartime mission, it never forgets that its purpose is to thrill and excite. Great action movies aren’t going anywhere any time soon. Like a good wingman, Top Gun: Maverick swoops in to save the day.Want more Thrillist? Follow us on InstagramTwitterPinterestYouTubeTikTok, and Snapchat.

Emma Stefansky is a staff entertainment writer at Thrillist. Follow her on Twitter @stefabsky.

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