New York

What It's Like to Run a Restaurant During NYC's COVID-19 Shutdown

James Beard Award-winning chef JJ Johnson made his culinary mark at upscale restaurants like The Cecil, Minton’s, and Henry. Last summer, he pivoted to open Harlem’s fast-casual Fieldtrip with a more humble goal in mind: to serve the local community. Built on the idea that rice is a global connector, Fieldtrip serves affordable, ethically sourced rice bowls topped with curries, veggies, and proteins like barbecue brisket and market fish.

But in the last week or so, everything changed. As the spread of COVID-19 intensified in New York City, Gov. Cuomo mandated that all restaurants must convert to takeout and delivery only, forcing Johnson to quickly make a switch. With a skeleton staff, Johnson is now taking on many jobs he previously outsourced himself — from deliveries to basic prep work. He’s dealing with the potential interruption of his supply chain, and a sharp decrease in business overall. Taking it day by day, he hopes to keep it all together financially.

We spoke with Johnson about the importance of community support in keeping his restaurant alive in the age of COVID-19 in the video and the interview below.

What’s it been like running a restaurant during this time? 

We’ve been calling it back to the basics — you know, head down, focusing on making sure the doors can open up hour to hour, making sure that we can function, figuring out how to retain as much staff. There are two big needs right now. The staff need their jobs — they’re paying rent or paying for college with the check that they’re getting from Fieldtrip. The second need is feeding a community of people who share rooms or don’t have big fridges.

How has your day-to-day changed?

I either open or close the restaurant myself. I’m the prep cook, or the packer, or the cashier, or the dishwasher at the end of the night. Because I can’t afford to have all my staff working, and I can’t afford to close the doors, I have to act out as many roles as possible. So, basically, I’m free labor to the business. 

Is there a bright side to taking over all aspects of the business?

I was always pretty involved in the business, wearing different hats everyday, but now I’m really embedded behind the line, cooking every day. 

What would you say is the biggest challenge you’re facing at the moment?

There’s so much information out there and you don’t know what’s true or false. Things are changing by the hour. People are scared, and that affects your business. Before, as a quick-service restaurant, we could kind of get into a flow, we could project our numbers, we could know who’s coming in based on all the past Mondays or all the past Tuesdays.

And now it’s just basically like, OK, let’s see how we do at 5pm, let’s see how we do at 6pm. We’re not really thinking about tomorrow. I’m like, let’s see how much food we have in the house, can we even afford to buy more food right now? Can we afford to bring in a prep person to do the prep job, or do I have enough time to do the prep work?

There’s so many moving parts as a small business owner, and it’s just been about trying to stay alive day by day. 

How long do you think the take-out/delivery-only model will be sustainable?

I’m not sure. Twenty percent of our business was delivery, 30% was pick-up or carry-out, and the other 50% was people coming in to sit down for either lunch or a quick dinner. I’m paying the same amount of rent, gas and electric bills, so the only thing I can really control is labor and food.

Plus, delivery companies are still taking 30-32%. You can do as much in-house delivery as you want, but that means you have to add a delivery person, so your labor cost goes up. My staff rotates and we do it ourselves, but only for really close deliveries. But if 20% of my business is delivery, that means I’d have to grow my delivery business by 300% to survive.

This will be my first week doing this — we’ll look at it, and then we’ll see how the numbers are.

What message would you like to share with consumers who are maybe hesitant to order take-out? 

I don’t want to say every restaurant, but for the most part, restaurants are clean. You see that big A letter grade on the window from the health department because we have high standards to begin with.

Now, with this pandemic, we are enforcing way higher standards than we’ve ever had before. And I mean things as little as sanitation wipes to wipe off a counter. I went through two boxes of gloves when I worked the last shift. I’m always nagging my staff: “Do you have your gloves on? Put your gloves on.Change your gloves.”

Even my staff is telling people to make sure they wash their hands. We used to say “See you next trip” when you leave. Now we say: “See you next trip and make sure you wash your hands when you get home!” Now we have to remind everyone, if you don’t wash your hands, it affects us. If we don’t wash your hands, it affects you. Now it’s like, let’s work together. 

What do consumers need to know about local restaurants right now? 

Your local restaurant, wherever it is in the country, truly needs you to order food from them. And if you can do it twice a week, that will help them to get by. Order your favorite thing for yourself or order food for the house. We even have kids meals. Some people have kids and they can’t cook all three meals for them. We try to make things really accessible for everybody regardless of income.

What role does the community play in helping your restaurant push through?

Community restaurants in places like Queens, Staten Island, the Bronx, Harlem, Brooklyn, these are places where the people that work in these restaurants live in the community. The customers feel like they can eat at those restaurants because they know who works there. And that restaurant might have helped transition that neighborhood in a way that wasn’t possible before, or might have given a job to a young kid that needed to get off the streets, or needed to pay for college.

I know a lot of people look at restaurants as a luxury, but they’re essential to the food chain. I’m concerned about my rice farmers that I can’t order rice from. They’re affected by this too. The impact is full circle: affecting the restaurants, the people producing the food, the people cooking the food, the people eating the food.

A restaurant does a lot, and in these times, the restaurant now leans on the community. And I think the community is okay with repaying the restaurant to get them through the moment because the community has, at some point, once leaned on them. We all have to help each other right now.Sign up here for our daily NYC email and be the first to get all the food/drink/fun New York has to offer.

Jessica Sulima is an editorial assistant at Thrillist.

New York

Scavenge for Peeps Cookies and More Fun Treats in NYC This Easter

The best Easter desserts in NYC this spring include Easter Bunny Churros and Carrot Cake Macarons.

Photo courtesy of Funny Face Bakery
Photo courtesy of Funny Face Bakery
Photo courtesy of Funny Face Bakery

As spring makes its way through New York City, not only do we get to enjoy beautiful weather, stunning cherry blossoms, and cool activities priced at $Free.99, but it’s also the perfect time for some limited-edition desserts.

With Easter fast approaching, bakeries are filling their shops with tons of chocolate eggs, carrot cake-flavoured everything and all types of flavours that offer both nostalgia and innovation within the city’s dessert landscape. After you’ve picked up a cake from the city’s best new bakeries, from Easter Bunny Churros to Carrot Cake Macarons, here are 8 Easter desserts to try in NYC right now.

Photo courtesy of Magnolia Bakery
Photo courtesy of Magnolia Bakery
Photo courtesy of Magnolia Bakery

Magnolia Bakery

Throughout April
Various locations
There’s great news for devotees of Magnolia Bakery’s Classic Banana Pudding: For Easter, the spot is mixing up the iconic dessert’s vanilla pudding with some carrot cake. The Carrot Cake Pudding is filled with freshly grated carrots, coconuts, pineapples, raisins, and walnuts. And if both bananas and carrots aren’t your thing, they’ll be offering their Classic Vanilla Cupcakes in pastel colours with a Cadbury chocolate egg hidden inside.

Photo courtesy of Funny Face Bakery
Photo courtesy of Funny Face Bakery
Photo courtesy of Funny Face Bakery

Funny Face Bakery

Through Easter Sunday
NoHo and Seaport
Known for their celebrity face and meme-worthy decorated cookies, fans of Funny Face Bakery know that a new fun design is always just around the corner. For Easter, they’ve created the adorable Hoppy Easter decorated cookie that resembles a classic box of marshmallow Peeps. Along with that, they also have the return of their fan-favourite Caramel Pretzel Chip cookie flavour, plus a set of three mini-decorated cookies perfect for gifting.

The Doughnut Project

Friday, April 7 through Easter Sunday
West Village
With the ever-changing flavours at The Doughnut Project, it’s super easy to miss out on trying out a new debut. But this Easter weekend, there will be two new flavours available. One is of course, a carrot cake doughnut topped with a cream cheese glaze, and the other is known as the Doughnut Nest-a French cruller “nest” with a cream-filled doughnut hole “egg” in the centre.

Photo by Cole Saladino, courtesy of The Fragile Flour
Photo by Cole Saladino, courtesy of The Fragile Flour
Photo by Cole Saladino, courtesy of The Fragile Flour

The Fragile Flour

Wednesday, April 5 through Easter Sunday
East Village
For stellar vegan desserts this holiday, head to The Fragile Flour, a plant-based bakery and dessert wine bar. They’re known for going all out for each holiday with a variety of new pastry options that you can pair perfectly with a glass of wine. This Easter, they’ll have a whole dessert menu that’s both delicious and gorgeous for posting on IG. The menu includes Stuffed Carrot Cake Cookies, a Lemon Cake (whole or by the slice), some festive cupcakes, and specialty macarons.

Photo courtesy of Kreuther Handcrafted Chocolate
Photo courtesy of Kreuther Handcrafted Chocolate
Photo courtesy of Kreuther Handcrafted Chocolate

Kreuther Handcrafted Chocolate

Through mid April
Midtown
For a luxurious take on Easter chocolates, browse the selections available at Kreuther Handcrafted Chocolate. You can even pick the Easter Signature Chef’s Selection for a special box curated by award-winning chefs. For something other than chocolate, choose between the Carrot Cake Macarons or the cake flavored Easter Marshmallow Trio, both of which are almost too cute to eat.

La Churreria

Throughout April
Nolita
This churro-centric spot is putting the cutest Easter spin on their crispy cinnamon churros by twisting them up into bunnies and bunny ears. At Churreria, choose from a Bunny Churro Lollipop topped with your choice of chocolate or dulce de leche and sprinkles, or the bunny ear churros in the Ube and Matcha ice cream sundae or the Ube Milkshake, both of which are made with ice cream from il laboratorio del gelato.

Photo by Briana Balducci
Photo by Briana Balducci
Photo by Briana Balducci

Lafayette

Throughout April
NoHo
You’ve surely seen this croissant tons of times while scrolling through IG or TikTok, whether it’s the Pain au Chocolat one or the latest of the month. Known as Supr√™mes, these filled croissants went viral and continue to live up to the hype each time a new flavour comes out. April’s flavour-sour cherry amaretto with a Luxardo custard and toasted almonds. While you’ll have to be super early and wait in line during one of their three drops of the day to get a taste, we promise you it’ll be worth it.

Photo courtesy of Levain
Photo courtesy of Levain
Photo courtesy of Levain

Levain

Seasonal
Various locations
We all know the iconic cookies from Levain-they’re gigantic, perfectly crispy and chewy, and well worth the long lines. For spring, the shop is launching a new flavour: Caramel Coconut Chocolate Chip. Filled with gooey caramel chips, fresh shredded coconut, and melty dark chocolate, it’s one you’ve got to try while it’s still around. To further celebrate the new season, all of Levain’s storefronts will be decked out in spring floral displays, serving as the perfect backdrop for pictures.

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Alaina Cintron is an Editorial Assistant at Thrillist. Her work can also be found in Westchester Magazine, Girls’ Life, and Spoon University. When she’s not at her desk typing away, you can find her exploring a local coffee shop or baking a new recipe.

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