Food and Drink

20 Dallas Restaurants That Have Thanksgiving Dinner Covered

Give your smoke alarm a break and leave meal prep to the pros this year.

Photo courtesy of Al Biernat's
Photo courtesy of Al Biernat’s
Photo courtesy of Al Biernat’s

If you wanted to let somebody else do the Thanksgiving cooking last year, you were pretty much relegated to take-out because of that whole pandemic situation. But we have even more to be grateful for this year, as restaurants have returned to welcoming guests inside for the big turkey-focused holiday feast with both cooking and clean-up included in the deal. Of course, if you want a more traditional at-home celebration with family and friends, family-size to-go packages can still be procured. Whether you pretend you prepped everything yourself is entirely up to you. Read on for 20 can’t-miss options for getting your hands on a lucky wishbone or that final piece of pie this Thanksgiving.

Photo courtesy of Commons Club
Photo courtesy of Commons Club
Photo courtesy of Commons Club

Commons Club

Design District
Enjoy Thanksgiving at the Virgin Hotels Dallas with a prix-fixe menu featuring Roasted Turkey Roulade, Sweet Potato Lollipops, and Pumpkin Pave for dessert. A take-out option feeds four and includes a 12- to 14-pound turkey or Bourbon-roasted Ham, several side dishes, and either a Pumpkin or Pecan Pie.
Cost: Dine-in menus run $95 per person; take-out packages start at $130 each (serves 4)
How to book: Reserve dine-in via OpenTable and call 469-436-7150 or email commonsclubdal@virginhotels.com by November 22 at 5 pm for pick-up.

Monarch Dallas
Monarch Dallas
Monarch Dallas

Monarch

Downtown
This modern Italian restaurant with fab downtown views and Michelin-star chef Danny Grant moves from Tiramisu to Turkey for a special holiday meal. The full dinner menu will also be served, should you prefer Whole Maine Lobster Spaghetti or a Comté-crusted Filet Mignon instead of Drumsticks and Cranberry Sauce.
Cost: Menus run $75 per person
How to book: Reserve via SevenRooms.

Soulman's Bar-B-Que
Soulman’s Bar-B-Que
Soulman’s Bar-B-Que

Soulman’s Bar-B-Que

Multiple locations
Feed a crowd with a la carte Cajun Fried Turkey or special meal packs featuring Smoked Bone-in Turkey with holiday sides or a full Brisket-and-Sausage BBQ spread with traditional accompaniments. Pre-order for pick-up and invite 11 of your closest friends and family to share.
Cost: Fried turkeys run $84.99 each; packages start at $134.99 each (serves 10 – 12)
How to book: Call your nearest location or order online for pick-up.

Fireside Pies

Multiple locations
Rockstar chef Stephan Pyles has collaborated on a menu with Fireside Pies once again, crafting a limited-time holiday feast starring Wood-roasted Turkey Breast and Chipotle Barbecue Pork Shoulder. Creative sides include Blue Corn and Chorizo Stuffing, Tomatillo Green Beans with Almonds, and Elotes.
Cost: Packages run $195 each (serves 4 – 6)
How to book: Call your nearest location for pick-up.

III Forks Prime Steakhouse
III Forks Prime Steakhouse
III Forks Prime Steakhouse

III Forks

Far North Dallas
Bring the family to dine-in with a special three-course Thanksgiving meal, or order a carry-out package that includes Turkey, Grandma’s Gravy, Sausage and Sage Cornbread Dressing, and Roasted Autumn Vegetables.
Cost: Dine-in menus run $59 per person; take-out packages run $160 each (serves 3 – 4)
How to book: Reserve dine-in via OpenTable or order pick-up online.

Photo courtesy of Primo's MX Kitchen & Lounge and Sfereco
Photo courtesy of Primo’s MX Kitchen & Lounge and Sfereco
Photo courtesy of Primo’s MX Kitchen & Lounge and Sfereco

Primo’s MX Kitchen & Lounge and Sfereco

Multiple locations
Customers can order take-and-bake Thanksgiving meals and pick them up from several different Refined Hospitality Concepts restaurants around town. Packages include either Roasted Turkey Breast, Roasted Whole Turkey, Smoked Ham, Herb-crusted Beef Tenderloin, or Texas BBQ Brisket.
Cost: Packages run $110 to $275 (serves 4 – 8)
How to book: Order pick-up online by November 23 at 8 pm.

Fearing's Restaurant
Fearing’s Restaurant
Fearing’s Restaurant

Fearing’s Restaurant

Uptown
Live large with Thanksgiving as imagined by celeb chef Dean Fearing at this restaurant inside The Ritz-Carlton, Dallas. Dine-in on a special three-course lunch or dinner (vegetarian options available), or order take-out packages starring Whole Roasted Turkey in autumn herbed butter plus Sage-sausage and Granny Smith Apple Brioche Stuffing.
Cost: Dine-in menus run $135 per person; take-out packages run $375 each (serves 10)
How to book: Reserve via OpenTable or order pick-up online.

Eataly Dallas
Eataly Dallas
Eataly Dallas

Eataly Dallas

NorthPark Center
Pre-order all you need for a grand celebration at home with everything from pasture-raised, antibiotic-free Turkeys to Salumi and Formaggi platters. The options are practically limitless, allowing you to create your own menu or choose from a specially curated meal.
Cost: A la carte menu prices vary; take-out packages run $250 to $400 (serves 4 – 8)
How to book: Order pick-up and delivery online by November 21 at 11:59 pm.

Photo courtesy of TJ's Seafood Market
Photo courtesy of TJ’s Seafood Market
Photo courtesy of TJ’s Seafood Market

TJ’s Seafood Market

Oak Lawn; Preston Royal
Set a course for an oceanfront-style chow-down with the freshest seafood options from TJ’s. A special take-out menu features party platters piled high with Shrimp, Lobster Rolls, or Caviar and Blinis among the specialties, plus lots of raw seafood by the pound and ready-to-eat seafood to foster DIY at-home creations.
Cost: Packages run $45 to $190 each; raw and ready-to-eat seafood prices vary
How to book: Order online for pick-up.

Copeland’s of New Orleans

Southlake
Capture the Big Easy vibe while making your meal prep even easier with Pilgrim Platters available in both dine-in form and take-away heat-and-serve packages. The highlight of both will be Cajun Fried Turkey, along with traditional sides, Biscuits, and Pumpkin Bread Pudding.
Cost: Dine-in Pilgrim Platters run $20 per person; Packages run $129 each (serve 6 – 8); additional a la carte menu prices vary.
How to book: Call 817-305-2199 to reserve or to order pick-up and delivery online.

Photo courtesy of Al Biernat's
Photo courtesy of Al Biernat’s
Photo courtesy of Al Biernat’s

Al Biernat’s

Oak Lawn; North Dallas
Dine-in on Thanksgiving Eve for a meal of stellar steaks and seafood and you can have your Thanksgiving feast for the next day waiting in your car when you leave. Create your own take-out spread starting with either a Whole Turkey with Gravy or a Smoked Spiral-sliced Ham, then add a variety of scrumptious sides, desserts, and select bottles of wine.
Cost: A la carte menu prices vary
How to book: Reserve via OpenTable or order pick-up online.

Georgie by Curtis Stone
Georgie by Curtis Stone
Georgie by Curtis Stone

Georgie by Curtis Stone

Knox District
On Thanksgiving Day, this Knox Street favorite rolls out a special holiday menu from executive chef Christian Dortch. You can also get the Thanksgiving To-Go option, stocked with a Roasted Heritage Turkey, sides, choice of pie, and bottles of Chardonnay and Pinot Noir.
Cost: Dine-in menu prices vary; take-out packages run $400 each (serves 4)
How to book: Reserve via OpenTable or order pick-up via ChowNow.

Photo courtesy of Truluck's
Photo courtesy of Truluck’s
Photo courtesy of Truluck’s

Truluck’s

Uptown; Southlake
Snag a table to enjoy a traditional Thanksgiving feast or opt for world-class seafood and steak alternatives from the regular menu. If you prefer to have everyone over at your place, pick up a curbside package that includes an oven-ready, Herbed Whole Amish Turkey, Broccoli Casserole, and other sides, plus Pecan and Pumpkin Pies. There’s even a video link from the chef with detailed, step-by-step prep instructions, so you can feel like you’ve had an actual hand in things this year.
Cost: Dine-in menu prices vary; take-out packages run $300 each (serve 4 – 6)
How to book: Reserve via OpenTable or call your nearest location for pick-up.

Meddlesome Moth
Meddlesome Moth
Meddlesome Moth

Meddlesome Moth

Design District
Even if you’re already planning to cook a big meal at home, make time for Thanksgiving Day Brunch with Chicken Biscuits, Morning Buns, seasonal cocktails, and other favorites from this Design District standby. Or you can go with the Moth Thanksgiving Plate, loaded with Sous-vide and Fried Turkey, Brioche-chestnut Stuffing, and Sweet Potato Purée with Curried Cashews.
Cost: A la carte brunch menu prices vary; Moth Thanksgiving Plates run $25 per person
How to book: Reserve via OpenTable.

Photo courtesy of Pinstripes
Photo courtesy of Pinstripes
Photo courtesy of Pinstripes

Pinstripes

Fort Worth
Start a new tradition of bowling and bocce when you hit up this Fort Worth bistro and entertainment district this Thanksgiving. For the entire week, they’ll be offering a special platter of Sliced Roasted Turkey, several sides, and Pumpkin Cheesecake for dessert. The special meal can also be ordered for curbside pick-up or delivery.
Cost: Thanksgiving platters run $19 per person; slices of pie run $7 each
How to book: Call 682-352-0808 to reserve, order pick-up, or schedule delivery.

Bacchus Kitchen + Bar
Bacchus Kitchen + Bar
Bacchus Kitchen + Bar

Bacchus Kitchen + Bar

Grapevine
A Mediterranean-inspired four-course feast awaits inside Grapevine’s spectacular Hotel Vin, complete with Herb-roasted Turkey, Truffle Gravy, and Green Bean Casserole. Save stomach space for the Pie Flight, which features a trio of Apple, Pumpkin, and Pecan. (Wine pairings would be a great idea, too, considering you’re in wine country.) To-go packages are also available for pre-order.
Cost: Menus start at $80 per person; take-out packages run $200 – $400 (serves 2 – 4)
How to book: Reserve via OpenTable or call 817-251-3040 for pick-up.

Ellie's Restaurant & Lounge
Ellie’s Restaurant & Lounge
Ellie’s Restaurant & Lounge

Ellie’s Restaurant & Lounge

Dallas Art District
Is it wrong that we want to skip right to the Chocolate Pecan Pie with Bourbon-salted Caramel Ice Cream? That’s what’s coming after a meal highlighted by Caviar, Herb, and Caramelized Shallot Dip with Kennebec Potato Crisps, Garlic-sage Turkey, Truffled Haricots Verts and Chanterelle Mushroom Casserole, and more delectable side dishes that will have you rethinking those dusty old family recipes next year.
Cost: A la carte menu prices vary
How to book: Reserve via Resy.

The Westin Dallas Stonebriar Golf Resort & Spa
The Westin Dallas Stonebriar Golf Resort & Spa
The Westin Dallas Stonebriar Golf Resort & Spa

Herd & Hearth

Plano
Located inside The Westin Dallas Stonebriar Golf Resort & Spa, this Texas-inspired restaurant hosts a special Thanksgiving experience for a buffet-style lunch. Dishes include Chili-dusted Wester Ross Pan-seared Salmon, Oven-roasted Turkey Breast with lemon-thyme-garlic rub, Roasted Turnips and Brussels Sprouts with bacon, and a variety of desserts.
Cost: Lunch buffet runs $62 per person
How to book: Call 972-668- 8941 to reserve.

Photo courtesy of Ten50 BBQ
Photo courtesy of Ten50 BBQ
Photo courtesy of Ten50 BBQ

Ten50 BBQ

Richardson
Why mess around with small portions when you can easily order several pounds of smoked meats and sides by the gallon? Go big, or go even bigger with a pre-set Holiday Pitmaster Package stacked with a little bit of everything, including Glazed Ham, Smoked Turkey Breast, Snapped Green Beans, Mashed Potatoes, and Fruit Cobbler.
Cost: Holiday Pitmaster Packages run $30 per person (15 person minimum); smoked meats run $60 – $150 each; sides run $44 each (serves 15 – 20); whole desserts run $40 each
How to book: Call 1-855-QUE-1050 to order pick-up.

Dive Coastal Cuisine
Dive Coastal Cuisine
Dive Coastal Cuisine

DIVE Coastal Cuisine

Park Cities
Design your own a la carte menu with numerous seafood options, including Smoked Trout Dip, Mini Crab Cakes, and Shrimp Cocktail Skewers. They’ll make perfect cocktail hour bites before a meal of Herb-brined Turkey or Beef Tenderloin plus sides like Vegan Coconut Cream Spaghetti Squash and Shaved Brussels Sprouts Caesar Salad.
Cost: A la carte menu prices vary
How to book: Call (214) 891-1700 to order pick-up.Want more Thrillist? Follow us on InstagramTwitterPinterestYouTubeTikTok, and Snapchat.

Steven Lindsey is a contributor for Thrillist.

Food and Drink

The Best Ways to Dress Up Your Summer Beers

From micheladas to shandies to fruit infusions, the power is in your hands-and kitchen.

Photo by Cole Saladino for Thrillist
Photo by Cole Saladino for Thrillist
Photo by Cole Saladino for Thrillist

Today, just about any flavored beer a person could dream up already exists in a can, from micheladas to shandies to, yes, pickle beers. But there’s still much to be said for the DIY versions of these dressed-up beers.

For one, they’re fresher (you could squeeze your own lemonade for a shandy right this instant). For another, they’re customizable: spiciness, fruit choice, how strong you’d like the final drink to be-all those are in your hands. And perhaps more importantly, they’re fun. Whether you want to spend two minutes constructing a beer-lemonade shandy or spend an hour infusing your IPA with real chunks of pineapple, there are plenty of ways to get creative in gussying up your beer this summer.

Embrace red beer

A brunch staple across the western half of the U.S., “red beer” is essentially a stripped-down michelada: just your preferred light lager of choice, plus tomato juice. But the devil’s in the details-folks can get mighty particular about their red beer specifications.

My preference is Coors Light with just a splash of Campbell’s tomato juice. It’s a pet peeve of mine when bartenders go too heavy on the tomato juice; it’s called red beer after all, not tomato juice. To make this yourself, start with your light lager of choice, then add just a splash of tomato juice so that the beer has a strong orange hue. Sip, taste, and add more if necessary.

Upgrade your salt rim

Another component of some micheladas, salt rims are more versatile than they might seem-and they complement several styles of beer. Just coat the rim of a beer glass with lime juice or water, then dunk the glass in a shallow dish of salt. Try the following combos:

• Mexican lager with a Tajin rim: Try substituting Tajin seasoning for straight salt for a bit of a chilli-lime kick. Pair this with a red beer for a michelada-like vibe.
• Gose with a herbal-salt rim: Goses are a beer style with a light salinity already, so pouring them in a glass rimmed with a rosemary salt or basil salt can add an additional flavour that doesn’t clash. Try mixing and matching fruited goses with herbal salts-how about a watermelon gose with a basil-salt rim?
• Dark lager with a smoked salt rim: Smoked salt is a surprisingly versatile ingredient because it’s way less powerful than liquid smoke. Try a dark lager (like Modelo Negro or a bock) in a glass rimmed with smoked salt for a subtle campfire vibe.

Marcos Elihu Castillo Ramirez/iStock/Getty Images
Marcos Elihu Castillo Ramirez/iStock/Getty Images
Marcos Elihu Castillo Ramirez/iStock/Getty Images

No shame in a shandy

Radlers and shandies are often used interchangeably to refer to a light-coloured beer blended with fruit juice (typically lemonade or grapefruit). Packaged versions exist, but with so many fruit-flavoured non-alcoholic beverages on the market, it’s worth playing around with some creative combos in your own kitchen. A good rule of thumb is to start light with the base beer, either a pale lager, cream ale, blonde ale, or (if you’re really a hop head) a pale ale. From there, most people blend in a splash of their favourite juice.

But here’s my preference: Use a fruit-flavoured soda. I find that adding straight fruit juice to beer often makes it too sweet and a bit flat. A high-quality fruit-flavoured soda, like the ones from Sanpellegrino, adds carbonation and fruit flavour with too much sweetness. Also, go easy on the ratio of soda to beer to start, because you can always add more soda. I find a ratio of about one part soda to three parts beer is ideal.

Infuse your beer with fruit

Your French press isn’t only for coffee-it can also act as a device for infusing fruit or other flavours into beer. If you end up with a bumper crop of strawberries or melons from the farmer’s market, this is a great way to use them.

1. Start with a new or perfectly clean French press to avoid coffee flavour leaching into your beer (unless that’s what you’re after).
2. Pour in your beer of choice. Almost any style could work here: light lagers, blonde ales, saisons, IPAs, even porters and stouts. Pour the beer into the French press, leaving a couple inches empty at the top.
3. Add some cut-up fruit. The possibilities are limitless: porter and raspberry, IPA and pineapple, blonde ale and mango, wheat beer and oranges, saison and cherries…
4. Allow the fruit to infuse. How long to leave the beer in contact with the fruit is up to you, knowing that the longer the mixture sits, the more pronounced the flavours will be. Start with 10 minutes, push the plunger down slightly, pour and taste some of the beer, and wait longer for a more intense flavour.
5. Push the plunger down all the way. Pour your infused beer into a glass and enjoy!

Make a mighty michelada shrub

Micheladas are typically a mixture of Mexican lager, lime juice, tomato juice, and salt. But recently, premixed michelada shrubs (like those from Pacific Pickle Works and Real de Oaxaca) have popped up, adding some vinegar tartness and other ingredients like Worcestershire sauce and spices to the mix.

A shrub combines vinegar with fruit or, sometimes, vegetables, and they’re easy to experiment with at home. Michael Dietsch, author of Shrubs: An Old Fashioned Drink for Modern Times, suggests that if you’re creating a shrub to mix with beer and tomatoes, beginning with a base of apple cider vinegar or malt vinegar (to match the malt in beer) plus lime is a smart start. From there, savoury additions like soy sauce will lend a Bloody Mary feel-just be sure to use a light hand with those umami-packed additions. Because vinegar and soy or Worcestershire sauce are tangy and savoury, Dietsch notes that you may want to add just a pinch of sugar to your shrub for balance.

From there, the sky’s the limit. Swap apple cider for white balsamic if you’re feeling bold, or add orange juice as well as lime. But regardless of what ingredients you use, Dietsch says it’s important to let a shrub sit and mellow for a couple days before using it. That time will let the intensity of the vinegar mellow and will ensure all the flavours meld together in perfect harmony. Once the shrub has sat a few days, give it a taste, then add a few splashes of it to your favourite Mexican lager.

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Kate Bernot is a certified BJCP judge and freelance reporter whose work regularly appears in Craft Beer & Brewing, Thrillist, and Good Beer Hunting. Follow her at @kbernot.

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