Food and Drink

The Best Things to Eat and Drink at Texas Rangers' Globe Life Field This Season

Brisket Egg Rolls, Alligator Corn Dogs, and Mac and Cheese Nachos-it's baseball time in Texas, alright.

Casey Rapp
Casey Rapp
Casey Rapp

Back in the day, snacking at Major League Baseball games was pretty much limited to hot dogs, popcorn, and those peanuts and Cracker Jack that people are so fond of singing about. But the Bigs have kept up with our food-obsessed times, granting gameday visitors the option to partake in unique creative culinary experiences between innings. Each year, Arlington’s Globe Life Field treats Rangers fans to a roster of potential all-stars, and this year is no different, with eight new menu items that might just prove popular enough to become permanent headliners inside the multi-level venue.

We’ve got the scoop on all the new eats (plus one batty beer) as well as details about three brand new stands making their league debuts this season. Check out these game-changing rookie prospects, then decide whether they should change the lyrics to “Buy me some peanuts and Cracker Jack-and while you’re at it throw in an Alligator Corn Dog.” (Or maybe something that rhymes a little better.)
 

Casey Rapp
Casey Rapp
Casey Rapp

Alligator Corn Dog

Bullpen Grill (Section 125)
The State Fair meets Cajun Louisiana in this on-the-stick offering featuring a slightly spicy alligator andouille sausage hand-dipped in corn batter then fried to perfection. A side of crispy french fries rounds things out.

Hurtado Barbecue
Hurtado Barbecue
Hurtado Barbecue

Arlington Eats

Section 101
Located near Section 101, this newcomer hosts Arlington restaurants in a pop-up format that changes after each series of home games. The first restaurants to be part of the local showcase include Hurtado Barbecue Co., Ella B’s Restaurant, and Prince Lebanese Grill.

The Beer Bat

Bars 12, B11, 126, 225
Batter up! Get one of these new clear plastic bats branded with the Texas Rangers 50th anniversary logo. As you’ve probably already guessed, they come filled with beer, but what you might not know is that you get it topped off with any draft beer you like (granted they’re sold at the stands).

Boomstick

Section 132
Think of this as the wild and wacky food trend imbued with flavor combinations that are as tasty as they are Instagram-worthy. The Boomstick debuted in 2013-all two feet of it-as the hot dog to end all hot dogs, topped with chili, cheese, jalapeños, and fresh onions. The whole thing weighs about five pounds, so it’s kind of a good bicep workout, too.

 

Casey Rapp
Casey Rapp
Casey Rapp

Brisket Egg Rolls

Go Deep Fried (Sections 121, 225, 230)
Dreams came true for one baseball fan who created this crave-worthy menu item as part of a recipe competition in 2020. Now available for everyone to enjoy, each crunchy egg roll wrapper is stuffed with smoked-onsite brisket and served with Togarashi-seasoned fries and a dollop of Sweet Baby Ray’s barbecue sauce.

Casey Rapp
Casey Rapp
Casey Rapp

Chicken Fried Brisket Sandwich

Sweet Baby Ray’s (Section 125)
House-smoked Nolan Ryan beef brisket is sliced thick then battered, deep fried, and layered on Texas toast with pickles, red onions, and Sweet Baby Ray’s barbecue sauce. It’s the perfect marriage of two Lone Star faves-chicken fried steak and barbecue brisket-that you’ll want to keep all to yourself.

Casey Rapp
Casey Rapp
Casey Rapp

Cornbread Chili Pie Dog

Sections 132, 225
If a Frito Pie and a hot dog had a baby, this might be it. Freshly baked cornbread serves as the bun, holding an all-Angus beef hot dog topped with Texas Chili’s chili, shredded cheddar, and Ricos jalapeños. Baddabing, baddaboom.

Casey Rapp
Casey Rapp
Casey Rapp

Golden Chick Loaded Fries

Golden Chick (Section 128)
Beloved fried chicken chain Golden Chick has taken their signature Lotta Zing Battered Fries and piled them high with bacon bits, Ricos Nacho Cheese sauce, and jalapeños. Grab a fork and lots of napkins-they’re messy, for sure, but so damn good.

Delaware North
Delaware North
Delaware North

The High Ball Bar

Near 421 Food Hall (Section 223)
Ballparks aren’t all about beers and brats any longer. Sure, you’ll find them at this soon-to-debut bar area, but the focus here is squarely on wine and specialty cocktails. The vibe is definitely more cocktail lounge than concession stand, too, with comfy sofas, lounge chairs, and other plush seating options.

Casey Rapp
Casey Rapp
Casey Rapp

Mac and Cheese Nachos

Sections 132, 225
If adding cheese makes any dish good, adding even more cheese always makes it better-and ditto that sentiment when it comes to carbs. Enter the Mac and Cheese Nachos: Tostitos tortilla chips get slathered in Ricos Nacho Cheese sauce then smothered in a heaping scoop of gooey macaroni and cheese, pico de gallo, Ricos jalapeños, and a touch of sour cream to cool it all down.

Casey Rapp
Casey Rapp
Casey Rapp

Vegan Bratwurst

Vegan Cart (Section 101)
The vegan options at Globe Life Field continue to grow, and this specific number is bound to make plant-based ballgame traditionalists happy. An Impossible Vegan Bratwurst arrivs on a fresh, locally baked vegan roll, topped with grilled onions. Simple and delicious.

Casey Rapp
Casey Rapp
Casey Rapp

Vegan Chicken Salad Sandwich

Sections 101, 205
Give a bite of this next ticket item to any carnivore and they’d be hard-pressed to distinguish this vegan bird from the real deal. Mixed with vegan mayo, grapes, and celery, the whole shebang is served atop heartily sliced vegan bread and complemented by an order of chips.

Globe Life Field
Globe Life Field
Globe Life Field

421 Food Hall

Section 225
The Texas Rangers’ first game took place in Arlington on April 21, 1972, and this still-under construction vendor lineup’s name serves as a nod to that date. Though not a food hall in the traditional sense, the complex will feature buffet-style dining with picnic tables and high-tops, plus an exclusive lounge reserved for season ticket-holders.Want more Thrillist? Follow us on InstagramTwitterPinterestYouTubeTikTok, and Snapchat.

Steven Lindsey is a contributor for Thrillist.

Food and Drink

The Best Ways to Dress Up Your Summer Beers

From micheladas to shandies to fruit infusions, the power is in your hands-and kitchen.

Photo by Cole Saladino for Thrillist
Photo by Cole Saladino for Thrillist
Photo by Cole Saladino for Thrillist

Today, just about any flavored beer a person could dream up already exists in a can, from micheladas to shandies to, yes, pickle beers. But there’s still much to be said for the DIY versions of these dressed-up beers.

For one, they’re fresher (you could squeeze your own lemonade for a shandy right this instant). For another, they’re customizable: spiciness, fruit choice, how strong you’d like the final drink to be-all those are in your hands. And perhaps more importantly, they’re fun. Whether you want to spend two minutes constructing a beer-lemonade shandy or spend an hour infusing your IPA with real chunks of pineapple, there are plenty of ways to get creative in gussying up your beer this summer.

Embrace red beer

A brunch staple across the western half of the U.S., “red beer” is essentially a stripped-down michelada: just your preferred light lager of choice, plus tomato juice. But the devil’s in the details-folks can get mighty particular about their red beer specifications.

My preference is Coors Light with just a splash of Campbell’s tomato juice. It’s a pet peeve of mine when bartenders go too heavy on the tomato juice; it’s called red beer after all, not tomato juice. To make this yourself, start with your light lager of choice, then add just a splash of tomato juice so that the beer has a strong orange hue. Sip, taste, and add more if necessary.

Upgrade your salt rim

Another component of some micheladas, salt rims are more versatile than they might seem-and they complement several styles of beer. Just coat the rim of a beer glass with lime juice or water, then dunk the glass in a shallow dish of salt. Try the following combos:

• Mexican lager with a Tajin rim: Try substituting Tajin seasoning for straight salt for a bit of a chilli-lime kick. Pair this with a red beer for a michelada-like vibe.
• Gose with a herbal-salt rim: Goses are a beer style with a light salinity already, so pouring them in a glass rimmed with a rosemary salt or basil salt can add an additional flavour that doesn’t clash. Try mixing and matching fruited goses with herbal salts-how about a watermelon gose with a basil-salt rim?
• Dark lager with a smoked salt rim: Smoked salt is a surprisingly versatile ingredient because it’s way less powerful than liquid smoke. Try a dark lager (like Modelo Negro or a bock) in a glass rimmed with smoked salt for a subtle campfire vibe.

Marcos Elihu Castillo Ramirez/iStock/Getty Images
Marcos Elihu Castillo Ramirez/iStock/Getty Images
Marcos Elihu Castillo Ramirez/iStock/Getty Images

No shame in a shandy

Radlers and shandies are often used interchangeably to refer to a light-coloured beer blended with fruit juice (typically lemonade or grapefruit). Packaged versions exist, but with so many fruit-flavoured non-alcoholic beverages on the market, it’s worth playing around with some creative combos in your own kitchen. A good rule of thumb is to start light with the base beer, either a pale lager, cream ale, blonde ale, or (if you’re really a hop head) a pale ale. From there, most people blend in a splash of their favourite juice.

But here’s my preference: Use a fruit-flavoured soda. I find that adding straight fruit juice to beer often makes it too sweet and a bit flat. A high-quality fruit-flavoured soda, like the ones from Sanpellegrino, adds carbonation and fruit flavour with too much sweetness. Also, go easy on the ratio of soda to beer to start, because you can always add more soda. I find a ratio of about one part soda to three parts beer is ideal.

Infuse your beer with fruit

Your French press isn’t only for coffee-it can also act as a device for infusing fruit or other flavours into beer. If you end up with a bumper crop of strawberries or melons from the farmer’s market, this is a great way to use them.

1. Start with a new or perfectly clean French press to avoid coffee flavour leaching into your beer (unless that’s what you’re after).
2. Pour in your beer of choice. Almost any style could work here: light lagers, blonde ales, saisons, IPAs, even porters and stouts. Pour the beer into the French press, leaving a couple inches empty at the top.
3. Add some cut-up fruit. The possibilities are limitless: porter and raspberry, IPA and pineapple, blonde ale and mango, wheat beer and oranges, saison and cherries…
4. Allow the fruit to infuse. How long to leave the beer in contact with the fruit is up to you, knowing that the longer the mixture sits, the more pronounced the flavours will be. Start with 10 minutes, push the plunger down slightly, pour and taste some of the beer, and wait longer for a more intense flavour.
5. Push the plunger down all the way. Pour your infused beer into a glass and enjoy!

Make a mighty michelada shrub

Micheladas are typically a mixture of Mexican lager, lime juice, tomato juice, and salt. But recently, premixed michelada shrubs (like those from Pacific Pickle Works and Real de Oaxaca) have popped up, adding some vinegar tartness and other ingredients like Worcestershire sauce and spices to the mix.

A shrub combines vinegar with fruit or, sometimes, vegetables, and they’re easy to experiment with at home. Michael Dietsch, author of Shrubs: An Old Fashioned Drink for Modern Times, suggests that if you’re creating a shrub to mix with beer and tomatoes, beginning with a base of apple cider vinegar or malt vinegar (to match the malt in beer) plus lime is a smart start. From there, savoury additions like soy sauce will lend a Bloody Mary feel-just be sure to use a light hand with those umami-packed additions. Because vinegar and soy or Worcestershire sauce are tangy and savoury, Dietsch notes that you may want to add just a pinch of sugar to your shrub for balance.

From there, the sky’s the limit. Swap apple cider for white balsamic if you’re feeling bold, or add orange juice as well as lime. But regardless of what ingredients you use, Dietsch says it’s important to let a shrub sit and mellow for a couple days before using it. That time will let the intensity of the vinegar mellow and will ensure all the flavours meld together in perfect harmony. Once the shrub has sat a few days, give it a taste, then add a few splashes of it to your favourite Mexican lager.

Get the latest from Thrillist Australia delivered straight to your inbox, subscribe here.

Kate Bernot is a certified BJCP judge and freelance reporter whose work regularly appears in Craft Beer & Brewing, Thrillist, and Good Beer Hunting. Follow her at @kbernot.

Related

Our Best Stories, Delivered Daily
The best decision you'll make all day.