Food and Drink

The 9 Best Donut Shops in Dallas

Don't be jelly.

Photo courtesy of Hypnotic Donuts
Photo courtesy of Hypnotic Donuts
Photo courtesy of Hypnotic Donuts

When it comes to fried rings of deliciousness, not all pastries are created equal. Donuts in recent years have become a blank canvas for some of the most creative edible masterpieces imaginable and folks can’t seem to get enough. From simple, traditional glazed numbers served warm to insane-sounding concoctions topped with everything from ghost peppers to cotton candy, these little pastries are guaranteed to put a smile on your face and make your taste buds dance. We’ve rounded up nine of the best shops in Dallas-Fort Worth to make your next breakfast date one helluva party.

Courtesy of The Salty Donut
Courtesy of The Salty Donut
Courtesy of The Salty Donut

The Salty

Bishop Arts District
The donuts at this Miami import begin with a 24-hour brioche base (except for the gluten-free and vegan options, of course), then go the extra mile with unique flavors like horchata, Texas sheet cake, and chocolate caramel pretzel. The Brown Butter + Salt-a brown butter glazed vanilla bean cake donut topped with Maldon sea salt-is the perfect salty-sweet collaboration. Add on an eye-opening cappuccino or cold brew and your day will be off to a fantastic start.
How to book: Stop by for counter service, order take-out online, or get delivery via DoorDash, Uber Eats, and Postmates

Courtesy of Hurts Donut
Courtesy of Hurts Donut
Courtesy of Hurts Donut

Hurts Donut

Frisco & Fort Worth
Based in Springfield, Missouri, Hurts Donuts’ gallery of cheesy photos repurposed to showcase crazy donut flavors fashioned to match the personality folks pictures is enough to land it a permanent spot on this list. As for the 70-odd donuts themselves, the sugar rush-inducing cotton candy edition is bound to have you nostalgic for the Texas State Fair, the Reese’s Pieces-topped E.T. will have you phoning home, and a Fruity Pebbles-laden original has elicited many a yabba-dabba-doo.
How to book: Stop by for counter service or order delivery via Seamless, Postmates, and Grubhub.

Courtesy of Detour Doughnuts and Coffee
Courtesy of Detour Doughnuts and Coffee
Courtesy of Detour Doughnuts and Coffee

Detour Doughnuts and Coffee

Frisco
In addition to a regular roster of traditional yeast and cake donuts, Detour creates a few extraordinary, limited-time flavors that rotate through on a near monthly basis. Current specials include orange and lavender, strawberry-clementine shortcake, and key lime pie, complete with brûléed meringue on top. And if you ever see fig and mascarpone on the menu, ask for a dozen.
How to book: Stop by for counter service, order take-out online, or get delivery via Grubhub.

Courtesy of Sweet Daze Dessert Bar
Courtesy of Sweet Daze Dessert Bar
Courtesy of Sweet Daze Dessert Bar

Sweet Daze Dessert Bar

Richardson
No matter what time of day you step into this sweets shop, you’re guaranteed to find something irresistibly tempting. They’ve already made our best ice cream list and now we’re shining the spotlight on their designer donuts, which include the Galaxy (a space-themed creation that’ll make you a true believer in donut-shaped planets), the eye-catching 24K Marble crafted to resemble a glistening white marble countertop adorned with an edible gold leaf, and a pastel tie-dye option with edible glitter for kicks. 
How to book: Stop by for counter service.

Courtesy of Jarams Donuts
Courtesy of Jarams Donuts
Courtesy of Jarams Donuts

Jarams Donuts

North Dallas & Lakewood
Instead of eating your feelings (hey, we’ve all been there), why not express your feelings with donuts courtesy of this playful dual-location bakery. Jarams’ alphabet donuts let you spell out anything you wish, whether you’re making a righteous proclamation (“FREE BRITNEY!”) or confessing something special to someone special (“WILL YOU MARRY ME?”). You can also choose from a variety of “Average Joe” donuts, as well as specialty offerings like donuts topped with cream cheese and fresh mixed berries, Fererro Rocher candy, or maple frosting and crispy bacon strips.
How to book: Stop by for counter service, order take-out online, or get delivery via DoorDash and Grubhub.

Momo’s Donuts

Sherman
Tucked away in the northernmost section of the Dallas-Fort Worth metroplex, this hidden gem is a hub for both local regulars and road trippers eager for a change of scenery and a few delectable donuts to go along for the ride. The Mexican-inspired sopapilla and apple pie donuts are standouts worth the extra mileage, as is the M&M fatty (a glazed donut topped with peanut butter frosting and plain M&Ms).
How to book: Stop by for counter service.

Courtesy of Hypnotic Donuts
Courtesy of Hypnotic Donuts
Courtesy of Hypnotic Donuts

Hypnotic Donuts & Chicken Biscuits

White Rock Lake
Come for the crazy donuts, stay for the gigantic chicken biscuits. The groovy, ’70s-themed shop located less than a five-minute walk from White Rock Lake was one of the first in North Texas to offer wild-and-crazy craft donuts and they’re still a hugely popular destination for hip pastries. Case in point? See the Peace-stachio with brown butter glaze and crushed pistachios, Jenny’s Evil Elvis with peanut butter, bacon, banana, and honey, or the Ski Accident, a longjohn stuffed with raspberry filling and rolled in powdered sugar. They’ve also been known to throw fresh jalapeños or ghost peppers onto their baked goods for an extra early-morning pick-me-up.
How to book: Stop by for counter service.

Glazed Donut Works

Deep Ellum
It doesn’t get much better than a simple, fresh, glazed donut from this Deep Ellum spot, but make them the base for all sorts of sandwiches and you’ve got yourself a ‘Gram-worthy meal worth 10,000 likes. Try the sweet and savory grilled cheese with bacon on a glazed donut, or the Grand Slammed made with egg, bacon, sausage, cheese, and maple glaze on a French toast-ified glazed donut. Or if you prefer to go all-sweet, load up on a donut ice cream sandwich made with Jim Beam bourbon vanilla ice cream. Enough said.
How to book: Stop by for window service or order take-out via Facebook and Instagram.

Courtesy of Urban Donut
Courtesy of Urban Donut
Courtesy of Urban Donut

Urban Donut

Uptown
Channel your inner Cake Boss at the DIY Design Bar inside this Uptown favorite. Start with a yeast ring, longjohn, bismarck, apple fritter, cake (chocolate, vanilla, red velvet, or blueberry), cinnamon roll, or brownie before choosing a filling, frosting, or icing. Then go crazy with toppings ranging from Oreos and Nerds to organic gummy bears and cookie dough. And you can always let the pros handle things by choosing from a vast array of carefully crafted flavor combinations, including a donut made especially for dogs.
How to book: Stop by for counter service or order take-out and delivery online.

Steven Lindsey is a Thrillist contributorWant more Thrillist? Follow us on InstagramTwitterPinterestYouTubeTikTok, and Snapchat.

Food and Drink

The Best Ways to Dress Up Your Summer Beers

From micheladas to shandies to fruit infusions, the power is in your hands-and kitchen.

Photo by Cole Saladino for Thrillist
Photo by Cole Saladino for Thrillist
Photo by Cole Saladino for Thrillist

Today, just about any flavored beer a person could dream up already exists in a can, from micheladas to shandies to, yes, pickle beers. But there’s still much to be said for the DIY versions of these dressed-up beers.

For one, they’re fresher (you could squeeze your own lemonade for a shandy right this instant). For another, they’re customizable: spiciness, fruit choice, how strong you’d like the final drink to be-all those are in your hands. And perhaps more importantly, they’re fun. Whether you want to spend two minutes constructing a beer-lemonade shandy or spend an hour infusing your IPA with real chunks of pineapple, there are plenty of ways to get creative in gussying up your beer this summer.

Embrace red beer

A brunch staple across the western half of the U.S., “red beer” is essentially a stripped-down michelada: just your preferred light lager of choice, plus tomato juice. But the devil’s in the details-folks can get mighty particular about their red beer specifications.

My preference is Coors Light with just a splash of Campbell’s tomato juice. It’s a pet peeve of mine when bartenders go too heavy on the tomato juice; it’s called red beer after all, not tomato juice. To make this yourself, start with your light lager of choice, then add just a splash of tomato juice so that the beer has a strong orange hue. Sip, taste, and add more if necessary.

Upgrade your salt rim

Another component of some micheladas, salt rims are more versatile than they might seem-and they complement several styles of beer. Just coat the rim of a beer glass with lime juice or water, then dunk the glass in a shallow dish of salt. Try the following combos:

• Mexican lager with a Tajin rim: Try substituting Tajin seasoning for straight salt for a bit of a chilli-lime kick. Pair this with a red beer for a michelada-like vibe.
• Gose with a herbal-salt rim: Goses are a beer style with a light salinity already, so pouring them in a glass rimmed with a rosemary salt or basil salt can add an additional flavour that doesn’t clash. Try mixing and matching fruited goses with herbal salts-how about a watermelon gose with a basil-salt rim?
• Dark lager with a smoked salt rim: Smoked salt is a surprisingly versatile ingredient because it’s way less powerful than liquid smoke. Try a dark lager (like Modelo Negro or a bock) in a glass rimmed with smoked salt for a subtle campfire vibe.

Marcos Elihu Castillo Ramirez/iStock/Getty Images
Marcos Elihu Castillo Ramirez/iStock/Getty Images
Marcos Elihu Castillo Ramirez/iStock/Getty Images

No shame in a shandy

Radlers and shandies are often used interchangeably to refer to a light-coloured beer blended with fruit juice (typically lemonade or grapefruit). Packaged versions exist, but with so many fruit-flavoured non-alcoholic beverages on the market, it’s worth playing around with some creative combos in your own kitchen. A good rule of thumb is to start light with the base beer, either a pale lager, cream ale, blonde ale, or (if you’re really a hop head) a pale ale. From there, most people blend in a splash of their favourite juice.

But here’s my preference: Use a fruit-flavoured soda. I find that adding straight fruit juice to beer often makes it too sweet and a bit flat. A high-quality fruit-flavoured soda, like the ones from Sanpellegrino, adds carbonation and fruit flavour with too much sweetness. Also, go easy on the ratio of soda to beer to start, because you can always add more soda. I find a ratio of about one part soda to three parts beer is ideal.

Infuse your beer with fruit

Your French press isn’t only for coffee-it can also act as a device for infusing fruit or other flavours into beer. If you end up with a bumper crop of strawberries or melons from the farmer’s market, this is a great way to use them.

1. Start with a new or perfectly clean French press to avoid coffee flavour leaching into your beer (unless that’s what you’re after).
2. Pour in your beer of choice. Almost any style could work here: light lagers, blonde ales, saisons, IPAs, even porters and stouts. Pour the beer into the French press, leaving a couple inches empty at the top.
3. Add some cut-up fruit. The possibilities are limitless: porter and raspberry, IPA and pineapple, blonde ale and mango, wheat beer and oranges, saison and cherries…
4. Allow the fruit to infuse. How long to leave the beer in contact with the fruit is up to you, knowing that the longer the mixture sits, the more pronounced the flavours will be. Start with 10 minutes, push the plunger down slightly, pour and taste some of the beer, and wait longer for a more intense flavour.
5. Push the plunger down all the way. Pour your infused beer into a glass and enjoy!

Make a mighty michelada shrub

Micheladas are typically a mixture of Mexican lager, lime juice, tomato juice, and salt. But recently, premixed michelada shrubs (like those from Pacific Pickle Works and Real de Oaxaca) have popped up, adding some vinegar tartness and other ingredients like Worcestershire sauce and spices to the mix.

A shrub combines vinegar with fruit or, sometimes, vegetables, and they’re easy to experiment with at home. Michael Dietsch, author of Shrubs: An Old Fashioned Drink for Modern Times, suggests that if you’re creating a shrub to mix with beer and tomatoes, beginning with a base of apple cider vinegar or malt vinegar (to match the malt in beer) plus lime is a smart start. From there, savoury additions like soy sauce will lend a Bloody Mary feel-just be sure to use a light hand with those umami-packed additions. Because vinegar and soy or Worcestershire sauce are tangy and savoury, Dietsch notes that you may want to add just a pinch of sugar to your shrub for balance.

From there, the sky’s the limit. Swap apple cider for white balsamic if you’re feeling bold, or add orange juice as well as lime. But regardless of what ingredients you use, Dietsch says it’s important to let a shrub sit and mellow for a couple days before using it. That time will let the intensity of the vinegar mellow and will ensure all the flavours meld together in perfect harmony. Once the shrub has sat a few days, give it a taste, then add a few splashes of it to your favourite Mexican lager.

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Kate Bernot is a certified BJCP judge and freelance reporter whose work regularly appears in Craft Beer & Brewing, Thrillist, and Good Beer Hunting. Follow her at @kbernot.

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